Book your accommodation with us in Simon’s Town for the Cape Town Cycle Tour Week: 3 – 12 March 2018. Ask for your 10% discount when you enquire if you or your group are participating! 🚲😊

16 Jan 2018

(Cape Town, 15 January 2018) Rumours that the 2018 Cape Town Cycle Tour has been postponed or cancelled as a result of the severe water shortages in the Western Cape, are unfounded and not true, says Cape Town Cycle Tour Director David Bellairs.

“The Cape Town Cycle Tour Management Team has been working tirelessly over the last year, looking at ways to ensure this iconic event can take place. A comprehensive plan is in place with all our suppliers and service providers to ensure that we reduce our reliance and impact on the municipal water supply to as close to 0% as possible. We believe this is achievable and are making every effort to meet this goal.

“We will also be asking all participants traveling to Cape Town to please support us in our efforts to conserve water during their stay in the Mother City. All participants will receive communications prior to the event to ensure that they fully understand the severity of the crisis and we will provide practical tips on how they can do their part,” says Bellairs.”

Eliminating the event’s reliance on municipal drinking water will be achieved through a variety of strategies and solutions including :

  • The use of grey water
  • The use of de-salinated water
  • Spring water brought in from outside the City of Cape Town
  • Chemical toilets & hand sanitisers
  • No shower facilities will be provided

As an event that has always prided itself on its proactive and responsible approach to environmental matters, we will do everything possible to ensure that our events’ water footprint has a negligible impact on our precious water resource – while still delivering a world-class event.

The entire net surplus of the Cycle Tour is distributed to the Rotary Club of Claremont and the Pedal Power Association. “The cost of the water strategy will mean that the Cape Town Cycle Tour’s contribution to charity will possibly be slightly less in 2018,” says Bellairs. “But we feel strongly that the event must go ahead, as many of these charities rely on this income for their projects, not to mention the significant positive economic impact the Cycle Tour has for the city and the province.”

The Cape Town Cycle Tour #40take2 will be staged on Sunday, 11 March 2018, with a new Start at the Grand Parade Precinct. Keep up to date with developments of the Cape Town Cycle Tour by liking our Facebook Page at www.facebook.com/cycletour or by following us on Twitter at @CTCycleTour or on Instagram @CTCylceTour.

For any event queries, or assistance with entries, please contact the Cycle Tour Events Office during office hours on 087 820 7223 or visit www.capetowncycletour.com.

ENDS

 

ISSUED BY:                                                The Cycle Tour Media Office

ON BEHALF OF:                                       Cape Town Cycle Tour Trust

DATE ISSUED:                                          16 January 2018

MORE INFORMATION

Tel:  021 686 0222

Email: media@cycletour.co.za

Source: capetowncycletour.com

Another year has come to an end, and here at the Cape Town Tourism offices, we’re ready to stride into 2018. When you live in one of most beautiful cities on earth, it’s not hard to find ways to make your future more exciting, fulfilling, and fun. We asked the Cape Town Tourism team to name some of the things they’d love to do before 2018 is over. Here is a list of 52 things to do in Cape Town in 2018—one for every week—to make it your most memorable year yet.

Take a ride on the Franschhoek Wine Tram

The Wine Tram is the best way to take in the Winelands. You don’t have to worry about driving or directions—you can just relax and journey through rolling vineyards, stopping at some of South Africa’s oldest and most distinguished wine estates.

franschoek-wine-tram-double-decker

 

Go horse riding on Noordhoek beach

Noordhoek beach is a picture-perfect stretch of white sand, backed by mountains and forest. There are few better ways to experience it than by horse-back, and Sleepy Hollow Horse Riding can take you on a guided trail no matter your level of experience.

Swim at Silvermine

Silvermine Nature Reserve is located in the middle of the Table Mountain National Park and offers some truly exquisite hiking opportunities. Take the trails leading through the fynbos, overlooking the whole city and the sea, to Elephants Eye cave. On the way back down, cool off in the beautiful Silvermine Reservoir. It’s a wonderful way to spend a summer day and is great for kids.

Learn how to surf at Little Bay

This beach, next to Big Bay ear Bloubergstrand, offers amazing views of Table Mountain across the bay. Aspiring surfers of any age and skill level can hit the waves here, and there are a number of schools around to help you find your feet. It’s also a popular kite-surfing spot.

Eat fish and chips at Salty Sea Dog in Simon’s Town

Cape Town does some of the best fish ‘n chips in the world, and it couldn’t get any fresher than at Salty Sea Dog. Get takeaways from here and take a stroll down the dock to enjoy your lunch overlooking the whole of False Bay.

Attend a Kirstenbosch Summer Sunset Concert

The Summer Sunset Concerts at Kirstenbosch are a summer favourite with locals. Take along a picnic blanket, drinks, and your favourite snacks and set up camp on the rolling lawns. There are great local acts as well as a few international headliners on the line-up every Sunday between November and April.

Jeremy Loops performing at Kirstenbosch

Jeremy Loops performing at Kirstenbosch, by Craig Howes

 

Picnic at Cape Point Vineyards in Noordhoek

Cape Point Vineyards is the perfect place for a picnic. There are terraced lawns, shady tables, and comfy cushions to set up your spot with. The venue is alongside a dam, with views of Noordhoek beach. Kids will have an amazing time here, and so will the adults. The Cape Point wines are award-winning and the Sauvignon Blanc is the perfect summer drink. The picnic baskets contain generous servings of gourmet food.

Have tapas at Bistro 1682 at Steenburg

Bistro 1682 has an idyllic location on the Steenberg Estate. The dinner menu consists of tapas-style cuisine with a fine-dining flair. The wines made right on the estate are fantastic, and there are4 few better ways to spend an evening than by washing down fresh oysters with a glass of Steenberg MCC.

Kloofing at Crystal Pools

Kloofing is the South African word for “canyoning”. For those who want a little more adrenaline than your standard hike offers, take a trip out to the Steenbras River Gorge, known locally as Crystal Pools, located near Gordon’s Bay. It’s a scenic but sweaty day of jumping into pools from heights of between 3 and 24 metres, as well as 45-metre waterfall abseil.

Check out ‘Roller Derby-ing’

Roller Derby is a full-impact women’s sport that’s taken Cape Town by storm. Women of all shapes and sizes take to the track for an hour of high-intensity skating. It’s not a sport for the faint of heart. Players smack into one another and falls are frequent. Try your hand at it, or head to one of the “bouts” as a spectator.

Go on a street art tour of Woodstock

Woodstock is a diverse and ever-changing Neighbourhood, and it’s at the forefront of Cape Town’s street art scene. There are walking tours available that take you around the neighbourhood to explore the art and get into the spirit of this eclectic, arty area. We recommend taking a tour with the enthusiastic and knowledgeable mural artist, Juma Mkwela.

Woodstock streetart building

 

Stroke a cheetah at Cheetah Outreach Aisha

By now we all know that posing with baby animals is a big no-no, so it’s great to find establishments that take conservation and rehabilitation seriously. Cheetah Outreach Aisha is a sanctuary and retirement home for cheetahs, where you can meet ambassador cats, or watch the world’s fastest land mammal go for its morning run. Unfortunately, no kids are allowed.

Play putt-putt at the Promenade

Miniature golf is a great time for both young and old, and where better to tee off than along the spectacular Atlantic Seaboard? It’s really affordable fun for the whole family and makes for an amazing post-lunch activity.

Catch a play at the Fugard

The Fugard Theatre is one of the best places to see theatre in Cape Town. This is where you’ll catch most of the city’s biggest productions. There’s a lot going on year-round, but if you’re here in January don’t miss the Fugard Bioscope National Theatre Encore Season. It’s a chance to see some of the most popular theatre titles of the 2017 bioscope season. The productions are filmed live and shown on the Fugard’s full-size high definition cinema screen with high-quality surround sound.

OMG Quiz Night at Alexander Bar

The Alexander Bar is an eclectic bar and theatre in the City Bowl. It’s a great place for a drink and a show, and their Wednesday night quiz-night is a hit with locals. It’s not like most quiz nights… check it out for yourself!

Walk the Cape Camino Trail

The Cape Camino Trail is walking pilgrimage route around the Cape Peninsula. It is inspired by the well-known Camino de Santiago, (the pilgrimage route in Europe) but is adapted for our South African conditions. The route takes in the diverse sacred spaces found in Cape Town, from the iconic Table Mountain to Cape Point, then back to the city along the Atlantic seaboard.

Cape Camino Forest Walk

 

Go snorkelling in a kelp forest

Under the surface of the sea on Cape Town’s coastline is a truly magical landscape most of us have never seen. The kelp sways gently in the current and light streams in from the surface. The plants can rise 30 metres from the sea floor, and many fish, crustaceans, and even seals flit about in this other-worldly scene.

Visit a market

Cape Town is spoilt for choice when it comes to markets, selling food, vintage clothing, antiques, crafts, art, and just about anything else you can imagine. Try the ever-popular Neighbourgoods Market in Woodstock on Saturday mornings, or the Earth Fair Food Market in the City Bowl on Thursdays.

Sample some local craft beers

This is the year for tracking down the best craft beer in Cape Town. This is no easy task—there is a seemingly endless list of local breweries making some of the finest beer you can find, and new ones are popping up all the time.

Have a braai at Oudekraal

Braai (barbeque) is one of South Africa’s favourite ways to eat. Make a fire, open a cold drink, and sit around with your favourite people watching the coals cook your food. Cape Town has a number of great braai spots, but Oudekraal, between Camp’s Bay and Llandudno, is one of our favourites. The braai areas are secluded and the view of the ocean is unbeatable.

Indulge in a spa day

Take your pick of one of the best spas in Cape Town, where you can find world-class treatments to suit any tastes. We’d recommend the Heavenly Spa at the Westin, with its amazing views over the city and bay.

westin arabella spa

 

Have high tea at the Mount Nelson

Your visit to Cape Town should definitely include a visit to the iconic Pink Lady. The Belmond Mount Nelson Hotel is famous for its lush gardens, luxurious quarters, and its traditional British high tea service. Get dressed up and enjoy sumptuous cakes, pastries, and sandwiches while a live pianist music sets the mood.

Go for a picnic in Kirstenbosch

The Mother City is picknicking heaven, where you can find all sorts of amazing pre-packed picnic baskets in beautiful settings. Kirstenbosch is an attraction in its own right, and arguably the best place of all to spread your blanket and snacks. You can pre-order picnic baskets or pack your own, and there’s plenty of space on the rolling lawns to set up.

Have sundowners on one of the Bakoven boulders

It’s not difficult to find a good spot to watch the sunset in Cape Town, but the Bakoven boulders are hard to beat. Soak in the view with a cold drink, ice cream, or some snacks, perched atop the amazing granite boulders that make this beach so distinctive.

Have brunch and unlimited bubbly at the Potluck Club

Sundays at the Potluck Club are for those who need to level up their brunch game. It’s a tapas-style restaurant started by Luke Dale-Roberts, of La Colombe fame. Here, brunch is a fine-dining set menu that kicks off at 11 am, on Sundays only. Tapas platters are served with many delectable treats. For an extra fee, you can also enjoy bottomless bubbly.

Go on the Newlands Brewery Beer Tour

The historic Newlands Brewery dates back to 1820 is the oldest operating brewery in South Africa. The tour lasts about an hour and explores the craftsmanship that goes into the beers. It ends with a beer tasting and a couple of pints in the brewery’s historic pub.

Newlands Brewery (2)

 

Have lunch at Mariner’s Wharf

Hout Bay is a fantastic sea-side neighbourhood in Cape Town that offers something for everyone, any day of the week. If you’re looking for some of the freshest fish and chips in the area, Mariner’s Wharf is where to find it. It’s situated right at the edge of the Harbour, and not only can you buy great food, but also marine artefacts, souvenirs, and antiques.

Hike in the Helderberg Nature Reserve

The Somerset West area is known for its natural beauty, and the Helderberg Nature Reserve is no exception. There are hiking trails to suit every fitness level, and the bird life is rich. There are also beautiful shady lawns which are perfect for picnics.

Go gin-tasting

Cape Town is famous for its wine, but there’s also a burgeoning gin scene in the city. There are many little gin bars and distilleries to visit. Check out Hope on Hopkins in Salt River. Don’t miss the amazing Bloedlemoen gin, infused with Blood Orange flavours!

Have lunch at Nomzamo Butchery in Langa

Langa is a township just outside of Cape Town, and Nonzamo does the best meat in town. There are also delicious sides, so even vegetarians won’t go hungry.

Visit the Hard Rock Café

The Hard Rock Café is a relative newbie on the Cape Town bar scene, but it’s rocketed to the top of our bucket list. Grab a burger and beer, and don’t forget the t-shirt.

Hard Rock Cafe_Ocean view

 

Go up Table Mountain on the cable car and take in the magnificent views

No Cape Town bucket list would be complete without a trip up Table Mountain. The Aerial Cableway affords 360° views of the city on your way to the top of the mountain. At the top are unbeatable views of the city, along with a restaurant where you can grab some lunch.

Go for a walk on the Sea Point promenade

The promenade is where Capetonians from all walks of life come together. You’ll see everyone here—joggers, dog walkers, families, cyclists, skateboarders, couples… you name it! The views are fantastic and the sea breeze is enlivening. Top it off with an ice cream at The Creamery Café to enjoy while you walk.

Have breakfast at Starlings Café

Starlings is one of the best brunch spots in Cape Town, and they specialise in tasty, healthy, fresh food. The eggs benedict is amazing, as are their fresh juices and home-baked pastries and desserts.

Visit Langa Quarter

Langa Quarter is one of Cape Town’s coolest hubs. The non-profit organisation Ikhaya leLanga has turned the area into a vibrant hotspot where Capetonians and tourists can and enjoy what that local community has to offer. There are jazz venues, art galleries, and restaurants to explore.

See an open-air movie

The Galileo Open Air Cinema has screenings almost every day in the summer. The venues are amazing, and you can take along picnic baskets and drinks. They screen classics, with a different line-up every year.

The Galileo Open Air Cinema

 

Enjoy bubbly and oysters at Sea Breeze

This trendy Bree Street eatery is one of the best places to get fresh seafood in the city, and their Happy Hour special is incredible—between 12-1 pm and 5-6 pm daily you can get oysters for R10 a pop!

Check out the duck parade at Vergenoegd

Vergenoegd Wine Estate is a little outside Cape Town, in Stellenbosch, but it’s worth the trip for the ducks! Over 1000 ducks live on the estate as a natural method of pest control. They take care of any snails and bugs that might otherwise spoil the vines. Between 9 and 10 am on weekdays you can watch the army of ducks parade around the estate. It’s a fantastic option for families.

Take a tunnel tour under the city

Beneath Cape Town’s streets, there is a massive network of underground canals and rivers, some of them dating back as far as 1652. You can take tours of the underground tunnels for a totally different perspective on the city. Check the website first to make sure they’re open, and don’t forget your torch!

Take a township tour in Imizamo Yethu

Imizamo Yethu is the township located on the slopes of Hout Bay. You can hop off the City Sightseeing bus here to take a tour with a local guide. You’ll explore the community, visit a tavern for a drink, and taste amagwinya (a deep fried dough served with savoury mince or jam).

Go kayaking with the penguins in Simon’s Town

Visit Cape Town’s favourite monochromatic friends without having to get into the cool waters when you take to a kayak in Simon’s Town. Boulder’s Beach is the best place to see the penguins in Cape Town, but kayaking is a great way to beat the traffic and see the penguins and other sea life while letting your legs get a rest while your arms do the work. Just remember to apply tons of sunblock!

Two penguins looking into camera boulders

 

Swim in the Silvermine Dam

The Silvermine part of Table Mountain National Park is a beautiful green oasis where you can braai, picnic, and swim with the whole family. You can also take a hike up to Elephant’s Eye for an incredible view of the southern side of Cape Town or take a guided hike to Noordhoek Peak. With the rich biodiversity in the area, there is much to see and appreciate and the water will cool you down on a hot summer’s day. There is an entry fee to pay at the gate (cash only), but you can get a great discount with a Green Card or Wild Card.

Go to the Cape Point vineyards Thursday night market

You’ll find everything from vegan sushi to beefy burgers (and amazing wine to compliment it) at the Cape Point Thursday night market. It’s a must-do for locals and visitors and for good reason. You’ll be spoilt with views of Noordhoek’s mountain and the awe-inspiring verdant vineyards.

Do the Hoerikwaggo trail

Envisaged as a great Cape trek that stretches from Cape Point to the Cableway station on Table Mountain, the Hoerikwaggo trail was supposed to be a five or six-day hike with tented campsites along the route. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to do an uninterrupted hike, but you can still take advantage of the incredible views and unique camping spots on this route. The tented camps at Orangekloof in Kommetjie are legendary and you can use them as a base to when you walk the Twelve Apostles trail, the contour trail or the reservoir trail.

Walk in Newlands Forest

Nature lovers will feel rights at home in this green paradise that feels like the home of fairies, gnomes, and unicorns. It’s right on the slopes of Table Mountain so you know you’re in for some inspiring natural sights and flora. Enjoy a peaceful walk or run under the trees or pack charcoal and meat for a braai at the nearby braai facilities.

Ride the City Sightseeing bus wine route

City Sightseeing has combined three of Cape Town’s favourite things all in one tour: Wine, beautiful scenery and great food. Their Constantia Wine Valley bus stops at Groot Constantia, Eagles’ Nest and Beau Constantia while driving on some of the most beautiful roads in the city. These three green wine estates have incredible wine and food on offer and the views are unparalleled. Plus you’ll hear some fascinating facts (in no less than 15 languages) while you drive, so it’s something we’d recommend for locals and visitors as you’re bound to learn something new. To take this tour you’ll need to take the Mini Peninsula Tour and hop off at Constantia Nek.

Groot Constantia wine pairing

 

Go paragliding

See the city from a bird’s eye view (literally) as you float about the Atlantic Sea Board on a tandem paragliding jump with reputable companies like Skywings, Fly Cape Town or Cape Town Tandem Paragliding. It’s not a scary experience as you don’t fall but rather float and have a chance to appreciate the view of the buildings, ocean, and Lion’s Head and Table Mountain. It’s a bucket list item we’d recommend you do annually for some fresh perspective on the beautiful Mother City.

Abseil down Table Mountain

Abseiling down a world icon is something all adrenaline junkies and adventure lovers should try at least once. Table Mountain, one of the seven new Wonders of the World, is over 1000 metres tall and you’ll get to abseil down at least 100 metres as you see the city like not many others have. It’s quite a rush! Be sure to take the Table Mountain Aerial Cableway up and down for a 360-degree view of the city.

Visit the Zeitz MOCAA

The Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa is the largest art museum in Africa, and the largest museum in the world showcasing the art of Africa and its diaspora. It opened in 2017, and it’s on everyone’s to-do list for 2018. The exhibitions change regularly, so even if you’ve been before, add it to your list!

Ride the train to Ceres

The Ceres Rail Company offers rides on a steam train from the 40s. It’s a fun and unique experience and takes you through some of the most picturesque areas of the Cape to Ceres. Onboard, you’ll find snacks, meals, and drinks to keep you going.

Have a cup of joe at Department of Coffee in Khayelitsha

The Department of Coffee is the first township-based artisan coffee shop in South Africa. It’s run by Khayelitsha locals who wanted to bring good quality coffee home with them, and they make a mean brew.

Walk down to Smitswinkel Bay and spend a day on the beach

Between Simon’s Town and Cape Point Nature Reserve, you’ll find the picturesque Smitswinkel Bay. Take a short walk down to the beach for an incredible view of the mountains and sea and the opportunity to snorkel, picnic, or go diving. Take a dip in the pretty rock pools when you feel warm and be sure to pack lightly for the trek up and down.

 

Source: capetowntravel.com

4 Jan 2017

LEVEL 6 WATER RESTRICTIONS

The City of Cape Town has implemented Level 6 Water Restrictions, effective from 1 January 2018 until further notice.

But what does it all mean? Well, a whole lot.

RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL CUSTOMERS

No watering/irrigation with municipal drinking water allowed. This includes watering/irrigation of gardens, vegetables, agricultural crops, sports fields, golf courses, nurseries, parks and other open spaces. Nurseries and customers involved in agricultural activities or with historical gardens may apply for exemption.

The use of borehole/wellpoint water for outdoor purposes, including watering/irrigating and filling/topping up of swimming pools, is strongly discouraged in order to preserve groundwater resources in the current dire drought situation. Borehole/wellpoint water should rather be used for toilet flushing.

All boreholes and wellpoints must be registered with the City and must display the official City of Cape Town signage clearly visible from a public thoroughfare. All properties where alternative, non-drinking water resources are used (including rainwater harvesting, greywater, treated effluent water and spring water) must display signage to this effect clearly visible from a public thoroughfare.

No topping up (manual/automatic) filling or refilling of swimming pools with municipal drinking water is allowed, even if fitted with a pool cover.

The use of portable or any temporary play pools is prohibited.

No washing of vehicles (including taxis), trailers, caravans and boats with municipal drinking water allowed. These must be washed with non-drinking water or cleaned with waterless products or dry steam cleaning processes. This applies to all customers, including formal and informal car washes.

No washing or hosing down of hard-surfaced or paved areas with municipal drinking water allowed. Users, such as abattoirs, food processing industries, care facilities, animal shelters and other industries or facilities with special needs (health/safety related only) must apply for exemption.

The use of municipal drinking water for ornamental water fountains or water features is prohibited.

Customers are strongly encouraged to install water efficient parts, fittings and technologies to minimise water use at all taps, showerheads and other plumbing components.

RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS:

All residents are required to use no more than 87.5 litres of municipal drinking water per person per day in total irrespective of whether you are at home, work or elsewhere. Therefore, a residential property with four occupants, for example, is expected to use at most 10 500 litres per month.

Single residential properties consuming more than 10 500 litres of municipal drinking water per month will be prioritised for enforcement (see note 1). Properties where the number of occupants necessitates higher consumption are encouraged to apply for an increase in quota.

Cluster developments (flats and housing complexes) consuming more than 10 500 litres of municipal drinking water per unit per month will be prioritised for enforcement (see note 1). Cluster developments with units where the number of occupants necessitates higher consumption are encouraged to apply for an increase in quota.

You are encouraged to flush toilets (e.g. manually using a bucket) with greywater, rainwater or other non-drinking water.

No increase of the indigent water allocation over and above the free 350 litres a day will be granted, unless through prior application and permission for specific events such as burial ceremonies.

RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO NON-RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS:

All non-residential properties (e.g. commercial and industrial properties, schools, clubs and institutions) must ensure that their monthly consumption of municipal drinking water is reduced by 45% compared to the corresponding period in 2015 (pre drought). (See note 1 below.)

All agricultural users must ensure that their monthly consumption of municipal drinking water is reduced by 60% compared to the corresponding period in 2015 (pre drought). (See note 1 below.)

The operation of spray parks is prohibited.

No new landscaping or sports fields may be established, except if irrigated only with non-drinking water.

For users supplied with water in terms of special contracts (notarial deeds, water service intermediaries or water service providers), the contract conditions shall apply.

NOTE 1: Failure to comply will constitute an offence in terms of the City’s Water By-Law, 2010 (or as amended). The accused will be liable to an admission of guilt fine and, in accordance with Section 36(4), an installation of a water management device(s) at premises where the non-compliance occurs. The cost thereof will be billed to the relevant account holder. Customers with good reason for higher consumption need to provide the City with motivation to justify their higher consumption.

Other restrictive measures, not detailed above, as stipulated in Schedule 1 of the Water By-Law, 2010 (or as amended) still apply.

Exemptions issued under Level 4B and 5 restrictions still apply, subject to review with the possibility of being revoked. Water pressure has been reduced to limit consumption and water leaks, and such may cause intermittent water supply.

In summary, the biggest takeouts are:

  • Residential units consuming more than 10 500 litres per month will be prioritised for enforcement
  • Non-residential properties to reduce consumption by 45%
  • Agricultural users to reduce consumption by 60%
  • The use of borehole water for outdoor purposes is discouraged in order to preserve groundwater resources

Source: thesouthafrican.com

20 Nov 2017 1

Keeping kids entertained during the holidays is a difficult job. Experienced parents know that when kids are kept inside too long they start to get a little crazy. If the only experience your little ones have with animals is Peppa Pig, then it’s time to broaden their horizons and let them get close and personal with Mother Nature’s majestic, weird, and hilarious critters. Here are our picks for the best animal encounters for kids in Cape Town.

Imhoff Farm

Imhoff Farm in Kommetjie makes for a great day trip with the kids. This quaint farmstead has a number of animal activities to keep your little ones entertained. There are also two restaurants where parents can unwind with a cup of coffee while kids can play on the lawns.

First, there are the camels. These no-nonsense creatures are taking none of your kids’ attitude, but little ones love them for it. Your progeny can take a camel ride while you snap a few pics or browse the nearby craft stall.

Next, check out the Higgeldy Piggeldy Farmyard, where kids can feed rabbits, goats, and ponies. After that, there’s the Imhoff Snake Park, a reptile sanctuary that’s a hit with courageous kids.

Finally, you can take your older kids to visit Imhoff Equestrian Centre and let them take part in a beach ride.

Website: imhofffarm.co.za

Two Oceans Aquarium

Named for the fact that the Indian and Atlantic Oceans meet at the Cape, The Two Oceans Aquarium is one of Cape Town’s best attractions for kids.

Featuring over 3000 marine animals, the Aquarium offers edutainment at its finest—giving kids the opportunity to learn about the rich biodiversity in our oceans while having an absolute blast.

Website: capetown.travel

Butterfly World

Step into another world at Cape Town’s unique butterfly park. This tropical greenhouse and garden is a delight for children–and gives parents a great opportunity to practice their photography skills trying to get the perfect shot.

There are also spiders and scorpions (don’t worry, they’re in glass enclosures), and Jungle Leaf Café offers coffee and a bite to eat after a morning of fun.

Website: butterflyworld.co.za

Boulders Beach

Boulders Beach is one of Cape Town’s most famous beaches. Situated in the old naval town of Simonstown, it’s on the False Bay coast which means the water is warmer than the beaches on the Atlantic side.

But it’s the penguins that are the real stars of Boulders. The African Penguin colony at Boulders attracts thousands of visitors each year and is a real treat for kids.

Kids love these waddling, braying little guys, and you can combine this unique animal encounter experience with some swimming and sand-castle building on the beach.

Website: capetown.travel

The Duck Parade at Vergenoegd Wine Estate

Have your kids ever seen over 1000 ducks going for a morning jog? If they haven’t then get them to the Vergenoegd Wine Estate on any day of the week.

The Duck Parade happens at 10h30, 12h30 and 15h30, so go for a breakfast or lunch at the excellent restaurants and let your kids roam the rolling lawns.

Website: vergenoegd.co.za

Cape Town Ostrich Ranch

Ostriches are weird creatures, and your kids will love their cartoonish antics. Head out to the Cape Town Ostrich Ranch on the N7, and your kids will be able to ride an ostrich, watch the funky male ostrich dance to impress his lady and play in the extensive play area.

The ranch has white ostriches, dwarf ostriches, black-necked ostriches and emus–more than enough to keep your kids entertained for ages.

Website: capetown.travel

Giraffe House

Want to take a guess what the main animal attraction at Giraffe House is? It’s Gerry, the hand-reared giraffe, of course. Despite the name, Giraffe House is not just about Gerry. They also have zebra, warthogs, monkeys, crocodiles and snakes.

Giraffe House is focused on educating kids about wildlife conservation and is the perfect spot if your kids are real animal-lovers.

Website: giraffehouse.co.za

Monkey Town Primate Centre

All kids love monkeys. There’s something about their cheeky, humanlike behaviour that resonates with the kiddie mind.

Monkey Town is the best place in Cape Town to view monkeys and apes. It’s a wildlife centre with over 700 animals, including chimpanzees that have learned basic sign language. It’s well worth the short trip along the N2 and makes a fun day out for both kids and adults.

Website: monkeys.co.za

The Alpaca Loom

The Alpaca Loom has got to be one of the most interesting animal encounters you can have in Cape Town. Created as a labour of love by Dietmar Keil and Kerstin Heisterkamp, this alpaca farm has a petting zoo and play area for the kids, and a coffee shop and gift shop for the adults.

You can also watch weavers at work in Alpaca Loom studio, weaving the unique alpaca fleece into scarves, beanies and jerseys.

Website: alpacas.co.za

Don’t fancy sharing your patch of sand with hundreds of other sunseekers? Check out our pick of lesser trodden beaches, tipped by those in the know.

With temperatures set to soar for the next few months, we thought it was time to reveal a few secret beaches – stunning stretches of honeyed sand or cool coves that remain uncrowded even on a sunny weekend in December. You might want to pack a picnic (and wear some comfortable shoes to get there), but the reward will be your very own patch of beach (and the soothing soundtrack of gently lapping waves). Paradise is a road trip away…

1. PLATBOOM


 Tim Young

Cape Point offers a fine selection of secluded, largely secret beaches (as you will see from our list) – but Platboom (Afrikaans for flat tree) is certainly our best pick, as it’s possibly the wildest, most unspoilt beach in the entire region.
Access runs past Dias Cross, though previous visitors recommend the north-south hike from Gifkommetjie (a 4km route).
With coastal views, and surrounding vegetation and fauna (including the occasional ostrich and baboon), the white expanses of sand are largely deserted, making this one of Cape Town’s most unique and unchartered beaches.
Why we love it There are chalk-white sand dunes and some rocky outcrops to explore, and it’s equally ideal for long, undisturbed strolls along the amazing coastline.
Secret pleasures It’s great for kite- and windsurfing, as it is very exposed – though these outdoor activities are really just for the pros. Due to its seclusion, swimming is not especially recommended, though you can certainly dip your feet into these pristine Atlantic waters!
It’s perfect for: birdwatching, photography, beach strolls and picnicking – just don’t feed Cape Point’s famous Chacma baboons.
Best time to visit during opening hours: 6am – 6pm (October to March); 7am – 5pm (April – September). Although the nature reserve is open throughout the year, spring and summertime are certainly our picks for the fairer weather.
Cost Cape Point Nature Reserve tariff: R145 (adults); R75 (children).
Where it’s hidden some 4.9km from the heart of Cape Point Nature Reserve.
Contact 021 780 9010, info@capepoint.co.za

2. DIAZ BEACH

Secret Beach – Diaz
Pinterest

One of Cape Point’s more famous beaches (though still definitely a secret unlocked by only a select few of the reserve’s numerous daily visitors), Diaz Beach makes for a truly unforgettable experience. Oh, and did we mention that it’s one of Cape Town’s most beautiful beaches, too?
Perhaps the reason Diaz remains largely undisturbed is because of the 20-minute walk from the parking lot down a rather steep set of wooden stairs. But for the stunning views alone, it’s undoubtedly worth it, as Diaz will render you breathless in the best possible way!
Why we love it It makes you feel truly alive, as you stand on its unspoilt shoreline and gaze at the crashing waves, towering cliff faces and unrivalled beauty. It is literally situated at the tip of Cape Point (on the western side) and is encircled by dramatic cliffs and wild waves.
Secret pleasures For the brave surfers and bodyboarders among us, you’ll love tackling its hollow barrels. However, swimming can be very risky here, due to the strong currents, so rather just wet your feet.
Best time to visit during opening hours: 6am – 6pm (October to March); 7am – 5pm (April – September). Try arrive early to make the most of your time and avoid the wind.
Cost Cape Point Nature Reserve tariff: R145 (adults); R75 (children).
Where it’s hidden A steep walk down from the Cape Point Nature Reserve.
Contact 021 780 9010, info@capepoint.co.za

3. PREEKSTOEL

Hidden Beach – Preekstoel
Tanya Michelle

The West Coast is a land of flourishing fynbos reserves, peaceful fishing villages and pristine beaches, including this 25km stretch of sandy coastline near the Langebaan Lagoon. The beach is named for the preekstoel (preacher’s pulpit in Afrikaans), a rock formation that juts out of the sand at the point where it touches the water, providing convenient shelter for those frolicking in the shallows below.
Why we love it for the long stretch of sandy coastline, pressed up against rugged cliff faces. There’s even a rusted shipwreck to add to the mystique.
Secret pleasures The warm waters are suitable for swimming, snorkelling and fishing, and the length of the beach makes it ideal for a long walk. Though braaing on the beach is not permitted, there is a braai area and picnic spot next to the Langebaan Lagoon.
Best time to visit Spring, when the West Coast comes alive with colourful wild flowers. Opening hours are 7am – 7pm (September to March) and 7am – 6pm (April to August).
Cost West Coast National Park tariff: R54 – R76 (adults, depending on season) ; R27 – R38 (children, depending on season)
Where it’s hidden West Coast National Park, between Yzerfontein and Langebaan on the R27.
Contact 022 772 2144, moipone.thathane@sanparks.org or reservations@sanparks.org
072 873 6453 (emergency number)

4. OLIFANTSBOS BEACH

Secret Beach – Olifantsbos
Ellie Shepley Montgomerie

This small, sandy beach in the Cape Point Nature Reserve is edged by wild, natural fynbos, and its stretch of coastline offers you the chance to discover at least three shipwrecks, which bear testament to the ferocity of the infamous Cape of Storms.
It is also a marine protected area and has a nearby shallow lagoon, which draws wonderful coastal birdlife to the area.
Why we love it Not only is it one of Cape Point’s best-kept secrets, it even has its own secluded guesthouse – a little, self-catering cottage nestled at the foot of a rocky outcrop and overlooking the peaceful, windswept beach. (Booking in advance is advisable.)
Secret pleasures Great birdwatching (and sometimes the occasional bontebok sighting too), several well-marked hiking trails (including the Shipwreck and Sirkelsvlei Hikes), and delightful beach walks along its pristine shoreline. Surfing is also great here, especially when there’s an incoming tide and the southeaster blows.
Best time to visit during opening hours: 6am – 6pm (October to March); 7am – 5pm (April – September)
Cost Cape Point Nature Reserve tariff: R145 (adults); R75 (children)
Where it’s hidden the first turn-off after the Cape Point Nature Reserve entrance on the reserve’s western side.
Contact 021 780 9010, info@capepoint.co.za

5. DALEBROOK

Hidden Beaches Cape Town – Dalebrook
Ed Babb

Kalk Bay’s tidal pools are a popular attraction, but not all visitors to the sleepy seaside village have discovered Dalebrook Pool, and those that have are reluctant to share it.
Why we love it The pool is maintained by the City Council, which combined with the natural barracuda effect provided by the waves, produces a particularly clean swimming area (as well as a secluded one, since the popular St James Tidal Pool tends to draw most of the crowds).
Secret pleasures The tidal pools are enclosed by man-made cement walls, which are still low enough to allow the occasional wave to break over, gently buffeting the pool’s occupants and making for a particularly enjoyable yet safe swimming experience.
Best time to visit Those who prefer warmer water will want to visit during the summer, though an icy dip during the winter can be quite invigorating.
Cost Free
Where it’s hidden Off Kalk Bay Main Road, opposite Dalebrook Road. A small subway goes under the railway line, providing easy access to the pool.
Contact Desiree.Mentor@capetown.gov.za

6. MACLEAR BEACH

Beaches Cape Town – Maclear
Natalie Soares

This quiet, isolated beach is yet another Cape Point gem, reached by following one or two fynbos-lined footpaths. Considered one of the most secluded beaches around, it lies just off the Cape of Good Hope, meaning it literally sits pretty near Africa’s most southwesterly point.
Why we love it The views are truly spectacular and it’s no wonder that years ago, Irish-born South African astronomer, Sir Thomas Maclear (after whom the beach is named), used to bundle his family into the horse-and-cart on Sunday mornings and travel all the way from Observatory just to picnic there.
Secret pleasures Picnicking, exploring rock pools, excellent diving, as well as crayfish, yellowtail and other kinds of fishing.
Best time to visit during opening hours: 6am – 6pm (October to March); 7am – 5pm (April – September), as well as spring low tide when the rockpools are at their best and there’s more beach to enjoy. There is also ample parking nearby, making it more accessible than Cape Point’s other beaches.
Cost Cape Point Nature Reserve tariff: R145 (adults); R75 (children)
Where it’s hidden close to the Cape of Good Hope, in the Cape Point Nature Reserve.
Contact 021 780 9010, info@capepoint.co.za

7. WATER’S EDGE

Cape Town Beaches – Water's Edge
Christoph

Off the beaten track, this one is considered something of a local secret in Simon’s Town.
Found at the end of paved pathway – running from the Seaforth Beach parking lot and past the back of Seaforth Restaurant – this beach offers a delightful, secluded bay, stunning views and a largely private day at the beach in one of Cape Town’s most popular seaside locations.
Why we love it It has the added benefit of lying between Seaforth and Boulders Beaches, which famously draw the crowds, yet it remains relatively undiscovered… In fact, most people don’t even know it exists! It is also a haven for children, making it a family-friendly option.
Secret pleasures largely untouched rockpools – inhabited by starfish, sea anemones, molluscs and other interesting sea creatures – as well as a pretty, sheltered bay, complete with shade-providing trees and awesome granite boulders. If you’re lucky, you might spot some penguins too. It makes for wonderful picnicking, swimming, diving and snorkelling, with great exploration fun and castle-building opportunities for the little ones.
Best time to visit during the day whenever the weather is best (or the other False Bay beaches are too crowded).
Cost Free
Where it’s hidden between Seaforth and Boulders Beach in Simon’s Town.
Contact 021 786 8440, simonstown@capetown.travel

8. WINDMILL BEACH

Windmill Beach Simon's Town
Samantha Sivewright

The lesser-known sibling of Boulders Beach, and similar in appearance, this spot is tucked away behind the golf course in Simon’s Town, surrounded by granite boulders that make for a conveniently sheltered swimming area.
Why we love it A colourful array of sea life dwells among the rocks, and since it’s around the corner from the penguin colony, you’re bound to see some visitors of the flippered variety. The water is shallow and sheltered by the boulders, making for a safe swimming area that kids love, especially if a few penguins happen to flop by.
Secret pleasures Great for swimming, snorkeling and picnicking. Since the reef contains such a diversity of sea life, it’s a popular diving spot, and especially ideal for novice divers due to the protected nature of the cove. Dogs are also welcome.
Best time to visit On a calm day, when there’s no swell. Winter is best as the swell is usually low. The site is relatively sheltered from the wind but can get rough when there’s a southeaster.
Important note There are no lifeguards or shark spotters on duty, and facilities are minimal. There’s a fresh-water shower, changing rooms and public toilets (though they’re not in the best condition).
Cost Free
Where it’s hidden Simon’s Town, behind the golf course. Accessed via Bellevue Road. Parking is available at Links Crescent, which is your first right after the golf course.
Contact 021 786 8440, simonstown@capetown.travel

9. SUNSET BEACH

Sunset Beach Western Cape
Jacobo

If you fancy sunsets and long walks on the beach, get them both – along with a view of Table Mountain that’s ready-made for postcards.
Why we love it It’s a lesser known alternative to Melkbos and Blouberg, free from the holiday hordes. It also offers some of the best views to be had from any beach in the Cape, with Table Mountain and Robben Island as the backdrop.
Secret pleasures Picnicking, sunbathing, swimming and bodyboarding. It’s also rated as the third best windsurfing spot in the world, after Hawaii and New Zealand.
Best time to visit As the name suggests, you’ll want to be here during late afternoon, so you can enjoy the spectacular sunsets.
Cost Free
Where it’s hidden Blaauwberg
Contact 021 550 1111

10. SCARBOROUGH BEACH

27 Des 2017 1

A secluded beach clear of crowds and visited only by the occasional surfer (or celebrity chef looking for a place to pick mussels). Dogs are welcome, but the locals would appreciate it if you helped keep their sandy hideaway a secret.
Important note The stretch of beach between Noordhoek and Kommetjie has seen an increase in criminal activity in recent times, including several reports of violent incidents. Visitors are urged to be cautious and alert if they choose to travel through this area. You can contact Komwatch for more information.
Why we love it The stretch of pristine white sand beside turquoise waters is a vision of idyllic seclusion and coastal beauty, and it’s great that your pooch gets to enjoy it too.
Secret pleasures The strong winds make it an ideal spot for windsurfing and kite-flying, though perhaps not such a great location for picnics. Be cautious if taking a dip, as the area is prone to rip currents.
Best time to visit Any time during daylight hours. Be sure to first check the wind forecasts.
Cost Free (dog-walkers require an annual Level 1 My Activity Permit (R270), as the beach falls within the jurisdiction of the Table Mountain National Park).
Contact 021 712 0527, tablem@sanparks.org (Table Mountain National Park)
021 712 7471 (information on My Activity Permits)
Where it’s hidden Camel Rock Road, Scarborough

You’ll also find peace and quiet at…

Gifkommetjie Beach (Cape Point)
Frank’s Bay (aka Froggy Pond, Simon’s Town)
Fisherman’s Beach (Simon’s Town)
Beta Beach (Bakoven)

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