Boulders Beach

Enjoy a day lazing at Boulders Beach and see the world famous penguin colony. Take a dip in the warmer waters of the Indian Ocean and find yourself swimming with the Penguins. Just remember this area is a sanctuary for them and they and their environment should be treated with respect.

Boulders Beach is home to the African penguin, which has been hanging out along the South African coast for years, in more recent times living shoulder to knee-cap with the local human population of Simon’s Town. Named “jackass” after their distinctive Eeyore impersonations, they occur in only 27 other sites, including Robben Island, and despite their large numbers at Boulder’s (some 3000), they are very much endangered …

Fishermans Beach

You will find the sandy shores of Fishermans Beach between the Simon’s Town Golf Course and the very well known Boulder’s Beach, which is home to many penguins and is extrememly popular with locals and tourists. If you’d prefer something a little quieter than Boulders, head down to Fishermans Beach.

Fishermans beach is enclosed by green lawns which are great if you’d like to play some games with friends, or if you prefer the sound of the ocean but the feel of grass instead of sand you can enjoy the best of both worlds here.

The water is slightly warmer than its opposing Atlantic Ocean beaches and this allows for a wide variety of water sports. Paddle out into the shallow waters and glide back in on a body board or explore the further reaches of the ocean on a kayak.

Glencairn Beach

If you’re heading out to Simons Town on the train why not stop off at Glencairn and spend a few hours at the beach? This fantastic little spot is popular with locals who enjoy taking their dogs for walks or basking in the sun for the afternoon.

If you prefer driving to the beach you’ll be happy to know that there is plenty of parking close by, however you will need to walk across the railway line, so take extra care when crossing.

Glencairn beach is also a great spot for whale watching in season and the resident shark spotters keep visitors up to date with the activity in the water. Enjoy a long stroll on the beach or simply enjoy the serenity the beach offers. Children will enjoy their time here to when they investigate the living creatures in the shallow tidal pool.

Seaforth Beach

Seaforth is the ‘freebie’ version of Boulders beach – more than a few of the penguins venture across here from Boulders Beach, particularly early morning and evening. It lies closer to Fish Hoek than Boulders, and has only Waters Edge beach between it and the former.

Seaforth is a beautiful beach, set in amongst a series of boulders and with a serious parking area, where a few traders sell their wares, and there is a restaurant. But it’s a fairly popular beach too, particularly during summer, because it’s a great swimming beach for children, so families head down here to camp out for much of the day.

The grassy slopes that overlook the beach are, understandably, the first spots to go because they’re so great for picnicking; some of them under trees. Get there early.

Smitswinkel Bay Beach

The Smitswinkel Bay Beach can be found, although not that easily as it isn’t very easy to access, just past Simons Town and next to the Cape Point Nature Reserve. You will only get to the beach on foot, so this is not suitable if you’re not fit as the walk is at least 15 minutes long.

The effort however, is well worth it! Because it is secluded this means it is quieter than many of the other Cape Town beaches and you’ll enjoy a peaceful day at the beach, should you choose. Take in the magnificent views of both the bay and the mountain. If you prefer to be a little more active on your beach day get involved in some of the activity as this bay is popular for diving, fishing and snorkeling. But remember since you’re walking to the beach you’ll need to carry all of your own gear!

The water is relatively gentle here so perfect for a mid afternoon dip to cool down. But please be aware that there are no lifeguards on duty here, so you will need to be extra careful when in the water.

Waters Edge Beach

This off the beaten track beach is one of the local secrets. Head off in a southerly direction from Southforth beach, Simonstown (i.e. veer right when the grassy verge behind the restaurant is in front of you), and you’ll find the path and sign for Water’s Edge beach.

It involves entering via what looks like a garden gate, which makes it appear to be a private beach, which it isn’t. The other way to reach it is along the sand and boulders via Seaforth. The beach may be regarded as part and parcel of Boulders beach but actually it lies between Seaforth Beach and Boulders, and most people know nothing about it.

The bay here is a wonderful haven for children, particularly the rock pools filled with star fish. It makes for wonderful swimming and snorkeling, and diving off the boulders adds a thrill’. But shhh, don’t tell anyone about it!

 

 

Source: SAVenues.com

 

 

 

Southern African Foundation for the Conservation of Coastal Birds (SANCCOB) and South African National Parks (SANParks) are hosting the annual Penguin Festival at Boulders Beach in Simon’s Town.

The festival starts with the release of African penguins that were rehabilitated by SANCCOB and takes place at 10h00 at Seaforth Beach in Simon’s Town. Parking can be found at the Seaforth Beach parking area.

Be sure not to miss this moving event as these penguins waddle their way back into the ocean.

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After the release festival-goers can head to the Simon’s Town Navy Sports Fields, situated right next to Seaforth Beach, for the start of the festival activities.

General admission is free and R100 for an all-access pass to the kids games. Kids under 2 enter for free.

The festival runs from 10h00 until 16h00 on the Saturday.

With the help of partners such as SANParks, SANCCOB admits close to 1500 African penguins (and a 1 000 other seabirds) for rehabilitation to its centres and releases them back into to the wild to boost the wild African penguin population. Alarmingly, only 2% of the African penguin population remain in the wild today.

Together, SANCCOB, SANParks and their partners in conservation are at the forefront of saving the charismatic African penguin species. All proceeds from the festival are donated to SANCCOB in support of their African penguin conservation work.

7 Ways you can help to conserve African penguins:

  1. Adopt and name an African penguin by visiting ttp://sanccob.co.za/adopt/
  2. Report injured penguins and/or oiled birds to SANCCOB by calling (021) 557 6155 (normal work hours) / 078 638 3731 (after hours & weekends) or to SANParks on 021 786 2329 (office hours) or 0861 106417 (24-hour emergency number)
  1. Donate to SANCCOB online at http://sanccob.co.za/donate.php or see what items are needed onSANCCOB’s Wish List http://sanccob.co.za/involved/#wishlist
  2. Visit SANCCOB’s online shop for penguin goodies at http://sanccob.co.za/shop.php
  3. Raise funds for SANCCOB by simply swiping your MySchool MyVillage MyPlanet card:http://sanccob.co.za/involved/#myschool
  4. Volunteer at SANCCOB by emailing volunteers@sanccob.co.za
  5. Start your own fundraising campaign for SANCCOB with Givengain:https://www.givengain.com/c/sanccob