4 Jan 2017

LEVEL 6 WATER RESTRICTIONS

The City of Cape Town has implemented Level 6 Water Restrictions, effective from 1 January 2018 until further notice.

But what does it all mean? Well, a whole lot.

RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL CUSTOMERS

No watering/irrigation with municipal drinking water allowed. This includes watering/irrigation of gardens, vegetables, agricultural crops, sports fields, golf courses, nurseries, parks and other open spaces. Nurseries and customers involved in agricultural activities or with historical gardens may apply for exemption.

The use of borehole/wellpoint water for outdoor purposes, including watering/irrigating and filling/topping up of swimming pools, is strongly discouraged in order to preserve groundwater resources in the current dire drought situation. Borehole/wellpoint water should rather be used for toilet flushing.

All boreholes and wellpoints must be registered with the City and must display the official City of Cape Town signage clearly visible from a public thoroughfare. All properties where alternative, non-drinking water resources are used (including rainwater harvesting, greywater, treated effluent water and spring water) must display signage to this effect clearly visible from a public thoroughfare.

No topping up (manual/automatic) filling or refilling of swimming pools with municipal drinking water is allowed, even if fitted with a pool cover.

The use of portable or any temporary play pools is prohibited.

No washing of vehicles (including taxis), trailers, caravans and boats with municipal drinking water allowed. These must be washed with non-drinking water or cleaned with waterless products or dry steam cleaning processes. This applies to all customers, including formal and informal car washes.

No washing or hosing down of hard-surfaced or paved areas with municipal drinking water allowed. Users, such as abattoirs, food processing industries, care facilities, animal shelters and other industries or facilities with special needs (health/safety related only) must apply for exemption.

The use of municipal drinking water for ornamental water fountains or water features is prohibited.

Customers are strongly encouraged to install water efficient parts, fittings and technologies to minimise water use at all taps, showerheads and other plumbing components.

RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS:

All residents are required to use no more than 87.5 litres of municipal drinking water per person per day in total irrespective of whether you are at home, work or elsewhere. Therefore, a residential property with four occupants, for example, is expected to use at most 10 500 litres per month.

Single residential properties consuming more than 10 500 litres of municipal drinking water per month will be prioritised for enforcement (see note 1). Properties where the number of occupants necessitates higher consumption are encouraged to apply for an increase in quota.

Cluster developments (flats and housing complexes) consuming more than 10 500 litres of municipal drinking water per unit per month will be prioritised for enforcement (see note 1). Cluster developments with units where the number of occupants necessitates higher consumption are encouraged to apply for an increase in quota.

You are encouraged to flush toilets (e.g. manually using a bucket) with greywater, rainwater or other non-drinking water.

No increase of the indigent water allocation over and above the free 350 litres a day will be granted, unless through prior application and permission for specific events such as burial ceremonies.

RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO NON-RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS:

All non-residential properties (e.g. commercial and industrial properties, schools, clubs and institutions) must ensure that their monthly consumption of municipal drinking water is reduced by 45% compared to the corresponding period in 2015 (pre drought). (See note 1 below.)

All agricultural users must ensure that their monthly consumption of municipal drinking water is reduced by 60% compared to the corresponding period in 2015 (pre drought). (See note 1 below.)

The operation of spray parks is prohibited.

No new landscaping or sports fields may be established, except if irrigated only with non-drinking water.

For users supplied with water in terms of special contracts (notarial deeds, water service intermediaries or water service providers), the contract conditions shall apply.

NOTE 1: Failure to comply will constitute an offence in terms of the City’s Water By-Law, 2010 (or as amended). The accused will be liable to an admission of guilt fine and, in accordance with Section 36(4), an installation of a water management device(s) at premises where the non-compliance occurs. The cost thereof will be billed to the relevant account holder. Customers with good reason for higher consumption need to provide the City with motivation to justify their higher consumption.

Other restrictive measures, not detailed above, as stipulated in Schedule 1 of the Water By-Law, 2010 (or as amended) still apply.

Exemptions issued under Level 4B and 5 restrictions still apply, subject to review with the possibility of being revoked. Water pressure has been reduced to limit consumption and water leaks, and such may cause intermittent water supply.

In summary, the biggest takeouts are:

  • Residential units consuming more than 10 500 litres per month will be prioritised for enforcement
  • Non-residential properties to reduce consumption by 45%
  • Agricultural users to reduce consumption by 60%
  • The use of borehole water for outdoor purposes is discouraged in order to preserve groundwater resources

Source: thesouthafrican.com

17 Okt 2017

With immediate effect, the City of Cape Town will be taking a number of new actions to drive down water consumption. This includes the institution of Level 5 restrictions and a further increase in pressure management.

But what does 87 liters of water actually mean?

The upper limit of 87 litres per person and the overall target of 500 million litres per day of collective consumptions remain in place, however, there is now a new emphasis on capping excessive water use at the domestic household level and placing additional restrictions on the commercial sector.

Measures to drive down consumption to 500 million litres of water per day are supplemented by other measures to augment the supply of water from non-surface water options by up to 500 million litres of water per day, which are currently under way. Together these actions form part of the approach to building water resilience over the short- to medium-term.

Notwithstanding the immense effort that many Capetonians have taken to reduce water consumption during the last year, there needs to be a further decrease in consumption if Cape Town is to safely navigate itself through the drought.

With regard to domestic properties, the 87-litre per person limit remains in place. However, the cap on individual domestic property usage is now set at 20 kl per month, beyond which the property owner will be subject to a very high fine. An engagement with the Chief Magistrate is forthcoming, but the fines are expected to be in the region of R5 000 to R10 000. Confirmation of fines will be announced shortly.

So what does 87 litres mean for Capetonians and South Africans… as we should all be saving water.

In order to figure out where and how we could save, I did a mini-audit of my daily use and this is how it went:

On average I drink around 2 litres of water a day plus have around a litre in my coffee (4 cups a day) but apparently the average cooking and drinking equals 15 litres a day (as per South African WaterWise stats).

I shower twice a day, once after gym in the morning and once before bed, which amounts to around 90 litres for a 6 minuter… which means I use up to 180 litres a day just soaping up.

Brushing teeth and washing hands apparently amount to almost 25 litres a day (as per South African WaterWise stats).

On average (that day) I went to the loo 6 times and I own one of those 9 litre eco-friendly toilets. That amounted to 54 litres used in just one day.

I also use my dishwasher once a day, every night which amounts to 20 litres a go and fill my pups and cats water up everyday which amounts to around 6 litres a day (I have 3 bowls of 2 litres each).

So… in total, my daily use is 300 litres.

Are you joking!!!! Thats not even counting the garden irrigation, filling up the pool every once in a while or dripping taps.

So how would I get down to 87 litres a day? Well, the next day I tested it.

The best way would be shorter showers, once a day not twice a day = can get to as low as 45 litres (1 Shower at 15 litres per minute for 3 minutes = 45 litres, its possible, I did it). I also put 2 buckets in the shower and used that for toilet flushing… up to 3 flushes!

Cooking, drinking, washing hands and brushing teeth feel like a necessity but in one day as I was able to get that down to just 12 litres.

The Dishwasher should only be used when full, and that for me is every second or third day = 8 litres a day. The pets would still need their 6 litres but my total was completely down.

Just by being a little “savvy” I was able to get my daily consumption to 71 litres. Totally doable.

The water crisis that is currently affecting Cape Town is also a South African crisis. We’re heading into “rainy season” in Johannesburg but there is no guarantee that we will have the rainfall we need so its up to every South African to make small changes to make a bigger difference.

Be more aware of your usage, and use a little less.

The best way would be shorter showers, once a day not twice a day = can get to as low as 45 litres (1 Shower at 15 litres per minute for 3 minutes = 45 litres, its possible, I did it). I also put 2 buckets in the shower and used that for toilet flushing… up to 3 flushes!

Cooking, drinking, washing hands and brushing teeth feel like a necessity but in one day as I was able to get that down to just 12 litres.

The Dishwasher should only be used when full, and that for me is every second or third day = 8 litres a day. The pets would still need their 6 litres but my total was completely down.

Just by being a little “savvy” I was able to get my daily consumption to 71 litres. Totally doable.

The water crisis that is currently affecting Cape Town is also a South African crisis. We’re heading into “rainy season” in Johannesburg but there is no guarantee that we will have the rainfall we need so its up to every South African to make small changes to make a bigger difference.

Be more aware of your usage, and use a little less.

17 Okt 2017 1

Sources: WaterWise | City of Cape Town | health24 / goodthingsguy.com

As you all know the Western Cape is facing extreme water restrictions and need to save as much water as we can.  This is something that affects each and everyone of us, but we also believe that we should not only be water safe in times of needs, but this is something we can add to our everyday lives and make it part of our lifestyle.

 

20 Ways to Save Water in an Emergency

19 Mei 2019 blog

During droughts, water supplies often become critically low. In some cases, whole communities are either without water or have very limited supplies. Water-use restrictions are often imposed on the residents of these communities. Priority is given to water needed for drinking and sanitation, while certain luxury uses of water, such as lawn watering and car washing, are not permitted.

The following is a brief listing of ways you can conserve water by modifying your everyday living habits.
  1. Where possible and economically justifiable, install water-saving plumbing fixtures in the home.
  2. Flush the toilet less often. In most cases, several uses can be made of the toilet for liquid wastes before flushing is required.
  3. Do not use the toilet for disposing of trash, waste paper, and the like.
  4. Make sure that your toilet does not leak. Place a few drops of food coloring in the toilet tank. If the colored water appears in the toilet bowl without flushing, your toilet is leaking—have it fixed immediately.
  5. Fix leaking faucets.
  6. Do not let faucets run for washing or rinsing. Always fill a container with water for this purpose or use the sink by stopping the drain.
  7. Do not water lawns or wash cars when water is in short supply. Also, try to water lawns and landscapes during evening or early morning to reduce evaporation from the sun.
  8. Brush your teeth before shaving in the morning so the cold water in the supply line is used instead of running to waste while you wait for hot water with which to shave.
  9. After brushing your teeth, use a glass of water to rinse your mouth rather than running water over the toothbrush and then using the toothbrush to rinse your mouth.
  10. Keep a bottle of drinking water in the refrigerator to avoid letting water run to obtain a cold drink.
  11. Do not prewash dishes for automatic dishwashers unless necessary.
  12. Do not use the garbage disposal. Compost vegetable peelings on your garden or put them in the garbage can.
  13. Take shorter showers. Remember, the longer you are in the shower, the more water you use.
  14. Collect water from roof gutters to use for lawn and plant watering.
  15. If your shower is equipped with a mixing faucet that can be set with a dial to the desired temperature, turn the shower off while soaping up. When you have finished soaping up, turn the shower back on to rinse off. If your shower is not equipped with a temperature dial, you may end up using more water as you adjust the water temperature again; consequently, this practice is not recommended for showers without automatic temperature adjustment or a shut-off valve in the shower head.
  16. When shaving, use water in the washbowl to clean your razor between strokes, or use an electric razor.
  17. Always use a brush, wash cloth, or your hand to dislodge particles of dirt when washing anything rather than relying on the force of the water to do the job.
  18. Allow small children to bathe in the tub at the same time.
  19. Use disposable diapers to avoid a toilet flush when rinsing a dirty diaper and to cut down on the amount of soiled laundry to be washed.
  20. Reuse kitchen drain water by collecting it in a container and using it to water plants, lawns, and gardens or to recharge the toilet reservoir for toilet flushing (be sure it contains no large solids such as vegetable peelings).

You may not find all of these water-saving tips valuable, but some will be worthwhile. You may already be doing many of these things as part of your daily routine. However, since most of these methods of saving water involve major changes in the way you do things around the house, they are suggested for use only in emergency situations. If you feel some of these suggestions could be applied to your ordinary routines, then by all means try them.

It should be pointed out that tips concerning the proper maintenance of plumbing fixtures to eliminate leaks are applicable under any circumstances. Studies have shown that many homes have leaking toilets and faucets. The first thing you should do after reading this fact sheet is check your plumbing for leaks and have them fixed.

 

Credit: PennState Extention