12 Des 2017

It’s natural to want to get out in the sun during warm summer days. It should also be second nature to take steps to protect your skin from the sun when you go outside.

Ultraviolet (UV) rays – from the sun and other sources like tanning beds – are the #1 cause of skin cancer. Too much exposure can also cause sunburn, eye damage, and premature wrinkles. But shielding your skin with clothing, broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher, and staying in the shade can help lower your risk.

Take these steps to stay sun-safe:

  • Cover up: When you are out in the sun, wear clothing and a wide-brimmed hat to protect as much skin as possible. Protect your eyes with sunglasses that block at least 99% of UV light.
  • Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher: Reapply at least every 2 hours, as well as after swimming or sweating.
  • Seek shade: Limit your direct exposure to the sun, especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when UV rays are strongest.
  • Avoid tanning beds and sunlamps: Both can cause serious long-term skin damage and contribute to skin cancer.

Choosing the right sunscreen

While you should use sunscreen every day of the year, it’s even more important during the summer, when the days are longer, the sun is stronger, and it’s easier to spend more time outdoors. When choosing sunscreen, read the label before you buy. US Food and Drug Administration regulations require the labels to follow certain guidelines:

  • Choose a sunscreen with “broad-spectrum” protection. Sunscreens with this label protect against both UVA and UVB rays. All sunscreen products protect against UVB rays, which are the main cause of sunburn. But UVA rays also contribute to skin cancer and premature aging. Only products that pass a test can be labeled “broad spectrum.” Products that aren’t broad spectrum must carry a warning that they only protect against sunburn, not skin cancer or skin aging.
  • Choose a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. The SPF number is the level of protection the sunscreen provides against UVB rays. Higher SPF numbers do mean more protection, but the higher you go, the smaller the difference becomes. SPF 15 sunscreens filter out about 93% of UVB rays, while SPF 30 sunscreens filter out about 97%; SPF 50 sunscreens filter about 98%, and SPF 100 filter about 99%. No sunscreen protects you completely. The FDA requires any sunscreen with an SPF below 15 to carry a warning that it only protects against sunburn, not skin cancer or skin aging.
  • “Water resistant” does not mean “waterproof.” No sunscreens are waterproof or “sweatproof,” and manufacturers are not allowed to claim that they are. If a product’s front label makes claims of being water resistant, it must specify whether it lasts for 40 minutes or 80 minutes while swimming or sweating. For best results, reapply sunscreen at least every 2 hours and even more often if you are swimming or sweating. Sunscreen usually rubs off when you towel yourself dry, so you will need to put more on.

source: cancer.org

8 des 15 blog                                                                                                           Wear Sunscreen Every Day

Sunscreen is necessary to prevent sunburns and minimize your chances of developing skin cancer. To best protect yourself against UV rays, you should use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15. SPF is also important when choosing a sunscreen- it describes how long the sunscreen will effectively protect you from the sun. SPF multiplied by the amount of time you can usually spend in the sun before burning determines the amount of time you are protected from the sun.

If you usually burn after fifteen minutes in the sun but you generously apply SPF 30 broad spectrum sunscreen, you should be protected from UV rays for a maximum of 450 minutes.

For best results, sunscreen should be applied BEFORE you go outdoors and reapplied often. The length of protection also depends on your outdoor activities—water will affect a sunscreen’s effectiveness. Refer to your sunscreen’s instructions for more information about how often to reapply.

Check the UV Index

Did you know that when the UV Index is very high (8+), your skin can burn after less than ten minutes of sun exposure?

The UV Index can be a very helpful tool for minimizing sun damage. This information can help you decide how frequently you should be reapplying sunscreen—more often on days with a higher index number—or what sort of protective clothing measures you should take before venturing outside. You may also want to avoid spending long periods of time outside when the UV Index is especially high.

Stay in the Shade

The sun’s rays are stronger between 10am and 4pm than any other time of day. The strongest rays occur around noon, when the sun is the highest in the sky. Whenever possible, it’s safest to stay in the shade during peak hours. If you are going to be outside between 10am and 4pm, protect yourself with sunscreen and appropriate clothing.

Wear the Right Clothing and Accessories 

You remembered to apply sunscreen before going outside, but are you also wearing the right clothing and accessories? A large-brimmed hat can help to protect your scalp, face, and neck from sun damage. Like your skin, your eyes can also be damaged by UV rays. Sunglasses aren’t just a fashion statement—they block most UVA and UVB rays and help to protect your eyes from the sun.

The clothing you wear in the summer can also affect your level of sun protection. Loosely woven, light colored clothing provides less protection than clothing made with a darker, tightly-woven material. A tighter fabric weave will help keep UV rays from reaching your skin. Make sure to supplement regular sunscreen application with protective clothing to best shield your skin from harmful rays this summer.

Check for Skin Cancer Regularly 

With all of the sun exposure you’ll be getting this summer, it’s a great time to preform regular skin exams every few months. Look for any changes in size, color, texture, or shape of moles or dark spots. Also look for any new or abnormal moles or growths. Make sure to have any abnormalities checked, as early detection can make all the difference when treating cancer.

Lastly, Drink Plenty of Water!

In the summer, it’s essential to stay properly hydrated. Dehydration is uncomfortable and can lead to serious consequences, including headaches, decreased blood pressure, dizziness, fainting, and, in extreme cases, death. When you’re spending time in the sun, you need to drink enough water to replace what you’ve lost from sweating. Generally, you should drink between six and eight glasses of water every day. In the summer, depending on the temperature and your rate of physical activity, you may require more water to stay hydrated.