Cape Town – loved and referred to as the mother city of South Africa, bringing about the enlightenment of a beautiful & diverse civilisation. The drawing card being Table Mountain which is globally recognised and adored as the only 7 Wonders of the World in an urban area and surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean.

It is within the deep South of the Cape of Storms that we find a special kind of magic. Majestic views of the mountains & oceans, diverse cultures, foods, arts, history, parks, accommodations and more are to be found, evoking traditional history to the genesis of the south. The locals bring about an easy-going energy to the way of travel.

So what makes Cape Town’s Southern Suburbs an ideal holiday destination!

The Location

A short and safe drive from Cape Town International Airport and the CBD allows for easy travel. Car rentals are easy to book and the best way for exploring Cape Town. Alternatively, other methods of transport are available. But let us face it, travelling independently by vehicle, adds to comfort and enjoyment.

Locals here recognise the Southern Suburbs by areas which range from Noordhoek on the Atlantic all round to the Southern side of the Cape Peninsula and back around the Indian Ocean to Muizenberg and deeper to Newlands, Constantia and surrounding areas.

Combining this area are seaside suburbs such as Noordhoek, Kommetjie, Scarborough, Cape Point, Simon’s Town, Glencairn, Fish Hoek, Kalk Bay and Muizenberg. This area brings a feel of Europe about and thus many travellers return for more, whether it is for business or leisure.

Spoilt for Choice

So much to see and do!

Internationally adored and visited by many for sporting events such as rugby and cricket. Found in Newlands, the stadiums are surrounded by excellent restaurants, shopping malls and also breweries allowing for a great traditional experience of fun and camaraderie.

En-route you can view historical landmarks such as the Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens, The Heart Transplant Museum, Groote Schuur Hospital, Rhodes memorial and The University of Cape Town itself. The views of Cape Point are spectacular, a great way to enjoy the drive is to stop and have lunch at any restaurant or market and move onto the next town or landmark for a visit.

Plenty of choices are available for families, the business traveller, the eccentric artist or the adrenaline junkie looking for a thrill. From hiking trails, fine dining, shark cage diving, museums, sporting events and travellers coming to catch the next big wave for a surf, the South is plentiful. For those romantic couples finding the one true love, a visit to Boulders Beach and the penguins in Simonstown makes for an adorable outdoor experience.

Leisure Accommodations

The South, with a Europe / Modern Dutch architecture feel, offers the most luxurious of accommodations as well as top-notch service with a personal touch.

With a variety of comfortable accommodation as well as upmarket guesthouses, many international icons, professionals and families have come to stay in these establishments returning faithfully each time to visit this beautiful city.

We strongly suggest a stay at the award-winning Mariner Guesthouse in Simons Town, enjoying breathtaking sea views across False Bay.

Mariner Guesthouse offers Sea & Mountain View en-suite bedrooms, and all bedrooms are elegantly appointed and cater for solo travellers, honeymooners as well as families.

The guesthouse is close to the historic towns naval base, museum and Boulders Beach.

Another great stop for a few nights would be in Constantia. There are some great hiking trails to be tackled or enjoy a picnic at the Botanical Gardens or visit one of the many restaurants.

This urban city with Table Mountain as the backdrop urges thousands of people to travel to Cape Town annually. With friendly service, museums, international sporting events, business & cultural conventions, history and a variety of hiking trails are what makes this city a unique hub for every kind of traveller.

WHERE TO FIND THE PENGUINS IN SOUTH AFRICA

Where to find them? – Ten islands and two mainland sites support the African penguin along the Western Cape coastline, and a further six islands in Algoa Bay in the Eastern Cape.

Seven of these support 80% of the world’s African penguin population. The most important in South Africa are Dassen Island, St Croix Island, Robben Island, Bird Island, Dyer Island and Boulders beach (technically not an island).

Did you know?An emperor penguin travelled 3 200 kilometres ending up on a beach in New Zealand, where he promptly swollowed a lot of sand, mistaking it for snow – he’s been nicknamed ‘Happy Feet’.

Namibia’s penguins are found in a group of islands and rocks along a 355 km stretch of coastline known as the Penguin Islands. Together they measure 2.35 square kilometres, the largest of which, Possession Island, is 0.90 km².

Mainland sites in South Africa include Stony Point, and Boulders Beach. Mainland colonies do well because the towns or human settlements function as barriers, keeping predators away from the penguins in much the same way as an island protects them.

Although for tourists these colonies allow a ‘bird’s eye view’ of the penguins in their natural habitat, endearing the diminutive waddlers to those passing through, living in such close proximity can bring its share of problems.

Betty’s Bay residents made news around the world, late in 2012, complaining about the ‘badly-behaved’ group of penguins who had taken advantage of a recently broken fence to wander into local gardens, braying all through the night and leaving numerous rather smelly calling cards in people’s gardens. Mainland penguin colonies then appear to be a safe haven for the African penguin, whose numbers have swelled in Betty’s Bay, despite their endangered status.

We recommend you visit Boulders Beach for the best viewing of the African Penguins.

Boulders Beach near Simon’s Town is a must for many reasons. It is tranquil, speckled with dramatic rounded boulders, lapped by the turquoise of the ocean, and home to scores of the endangered African penguin. In fact, it remains one of the most visited beaches in and around Cape Town, as visitors from all over the world come here to get up close to the cute and quirky birds.

The ancient granite boulders have been rounded by eons of wind and water erosion, giving them a romantic appeal. But, more than this, they provide excellent shelter from big waves or excessive wind. This makes the beach perfect for long, lazy days spent soaking up the sun. The waters here are still from the Indian Ocean, making them a tad warmer than those of the Atlantic Ocean just a little further on. So, Boulders Beach is ideal for little ones that prefer the warmer, calmer waters to tackling the waves.

But, the penguins are certainly the highlight of Boulders beach. And, to get the most out of seeing this massive colony (currently with a population of around 3 000 birds), there are three unobtrusive boardwalks as well as a penguin viewing area. From these, you can watch them play, swim, feed and care for their young. The African penguin was once called the jackass penguin because of the sound it makes (which sounds peculiarly like a donkey braying). Although they can be found all the way from Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape to Namibia, they are most easily (and abundantly) seen here on Boulders Beach (and its neighbouring Foxy Beach).

Because Boulders is a sanctuary for the African penguin, it is crucial that all visitors respect it and care for it.

Simon’s Town is renowned as a naval base, and has a fascinating variety of boats in its harbour. More than this, it is quaint and charming, and a hotspot for excellent dining. It is less than an hour from Cape Town and the V & A Waterfront.

Source Credit: www.sa-venues.com

Visiting the quirky penguins at Boulders Beach, between Simon’s Town and Cape Point, is a unique experience.
The colony, which lives incongruously in the middle of a residential area, is one of the few sites where African penguins – previously called Jackass penguins because of their braying call – can be observed at close range, as they wander freely in a protected natural environment.

Boulders forms part of the Table Mountain National Park (TMNP) Marine Protected Area and an entrance fee is required to access the sandy shores. Strictly controlled access to this beach by the South African National Parks (SANparks) authority ensures it is always clean and tidy and the facilities are well maintained and spotless. These facilities include toilets  and outdoor beach showers. The beach is a real hit with little ones as it offers a very gentle and warm ocean swimming experience. The immense boulders after which the beach is named shelter the cove from currents and large waves – but please always take care. Also, don’t touch or feed the penguins. They might look cute and cuddly but their beaks are razor sharp and if they feel threatened they have no qualms about nipping the odd finger or nose. They also feel nothing about traipsing through your picnic lunch and over your towels. Once through the turnstiles, stake your claim on the pristine sand – check the tides beforehand, this is a very narrow beach – and then freely explore the large 540 million year-old granite boulders, small rock pools and little bays in close proximity of the penguins. UP CLOSE To view the African penguins and their nesting and breeding sites, a superb walkway has been established at Foxy Beach, just a short stroll from the actual Boulders Beach.

This takes the visitor on an intimate tour of the area these birds call home. The boardwalks are all wheelchair-friendly and will take you within metres of the birds. There is also a visitors’ centre accessed on foot using “Willis Walk” from the Bellevue Road/Cape Point side, or via Kleintuin Road from the Seaforth Road/Simon’s Town side. The area is patrolled by park rangers to ensure visitors’ safety and that of the birds. Boulders Beach has plenty of food and accommodation offerings close to the gates (although nothing is on offer inside the reserve precinct).

Source: capetown.travel

The Top 5 Threats to Penguins – And What You Can Do to Help

 

hey say to dress for the job you want, not the job you have. If penguins’ black and white getup is anything to go by, these birds would rather be butlers. And who’s to blame them? From invasive predators to toxic plastics, penguins around the world face a litany of serious threats. This Friday is Penguin Awareness Day, which means there’s no better time to learn about the biggest dangers to penguins — and how you can help the ocean’s best-dressed birds thrive for years to come.

1. Overfishing 

Jackass penguins rest on the beach near Cape Town, South Africa. African penguins have been hard-hit by overfishing of their preferred prey species. Credit: Sergey Uryadnikov / Shutterstock

Jackass penguins — named for their donkey-like braying — are the only species of penguin to call Africa home. In the 1950s, Namibia’s jackass penguins mostly ate fatty, nutritious sardines. But in the 1970s, overfishing triggered a collapse of sardine stocks. Namibian penguin colonies were forced to switch to bearded gobies as their main source of prey. Though these gobies are abundant, they’re low in fat and nutrients — making them the penguin equivalent of junk food. A 2010 report blamed this crummy diet for the decline in the country’s penguin populations. In South Africa, similar collapses of small bait fish also caused jackass penguins to drop precipitously. And there are fears that in Antarctica, the fledgling krill fishery has the potential to decimate Adelie, chinstrap, gentoo and macaroni penguins if not tightly controlled.

2. Plastic pollution 

A fairy penguin killed by plastic trash on Troubridge Island, Australia. Credit: Jane McKenzie / Environment Protection Authority South Australia

By 2050, nearly every species of seabird will be accidentally eating plastic debris — and that includes penguins. This is the conclusion from a 2015 study that warned that, at current rates of plastic production and pollution, 99.8 percent of the 186 species included in the report would be chowing down on plastic trash by mid-century. Eating plastic causes major problems for penguins  and other marine animals. If a bird swallows enough plastic, for example, the indigestible scraps can build up in its gut and prevent it from digesting real food. Plastic is also efficient at absorbing industrial toxins from ocean water. These pollutants have been linked to a slew of health problems from neurological and reproductive disorders to cancer and birth defects.

3. Industrial development

Proposed industrial developments threaten the world’s largest colony of Humboldt penguins. Credit: Natural Earth Imagery / Shutterstock

In Chile, a cluster of islands off Punta de Choros is home to approximately 80 percent of the world’s Humboldt penguins. But this vital nesting site is being threatened by two new open-pit mines, a desalinization plant and a commercial port. Increasing ship traffic and coastal development will expose the region’s marine life to pollution, oil spills, disruptive noise and habitat loss. Now, Oceana Chile is partnering with local communities, other NGOs and concerned Chilean citizens to oppose the new development and protect this vital stronghold for Humboldt penguins.

4. Invasive predators

Fairy penguins are the smallest species of penguin — making them perfect fodder for invasive foxes. Credit: EA Given / Shutterstock

On Australia’s Middle Island, fairy penguin numbers plummeted after red foxes were introduced on the mainland to control rabbit populations. But foxes quickly learned they could cross to the island at low tide and feast on adult penguins and their chicks. In 1999, there were over 500 resident penguins. By 2006, that number plummeted to fewer than 10. Luckily, a local man had the smart idea of raising Maremma livestock guardian dogs among these blue-hued birds. The puppies imprinted on the penguins and defended them from foxes. Since then, there’s been no evidence that foxes have killed a single one of these fish-loving fairies.

Penguins elsewhere are not so lucky. On the Galapagos Islands, made famous by Charles Darwin, resident penguins face an onslaught of invaders they did not evolve to withstand. Introduced black rats and house mice feast on penguin eggs. Nonnative plants destroy nesting habitat. And in 2007, a single house cat at Isabela Island’s Caleta Iguana increased the average yearly risk of death for an adult penguin by 49 percent — proving that Little Fluffy can be a voracious killer of wildlife if not kept indoors.

5. Climate change

Climate change is increasing the intensity of storms and decreasing penguins’ food supply, which makes life particularly tough for penguin chicks. Credit: 2j architecture / Shutterstock

In Punta Tombo, Argentina, storms are becoming more intense and frequent, and that’s bad news for Magellanic penguin chicks. A 2014 study that tracked almost 3,500 chicks from 1983 to 2010 found that rainstorms and extreme temperatures were major causes of death for young penguins. Rain is particularly harmful to chicks as their fluffy down is only insulating when it’s dry. Over the 27-year-long study, penguin numbers dropped by 20 percent while the number of storms during each nesting season rose. This makes climate change one of the potential culprits behind Punta Tombo’s missing Magellans.

Climate change doesn’t just hurt penguin chicks directly. It can also slash the amount of food that their parents can find and bring back to the nest. Rockhopper penguins, which breed on islands and coastlines north of the Antarctic Circle, have seen some giant population drops in recent years. On Marion Island, 1,900 kilometers (1,200 miles) south of Cape Town, rockhopper penguin numbers plummeted by 52 percent from 1987 to 2013. One 2008 study attributed this decline to the underfed conditions of adults — which in turn was bad news for hungry chicks entirely dependent on their parents for food. Warmer water, shifting winds and a host of other climate change induced factors may be to blame for the starving birds.

How you can help

It can be hard to directly help a penguin in trouble — after all, most of the world’s human population lives in the northern hemisphere, and all penguins species live south of the equator. But there are plenty of ways you can support healthy, vibrant oceans.

 

Source credit: https://oceana.org/

 

Things you have to do at least once (or every once in a while) as a visitor and local

This is our essential checklist of 59 things to do in Cape Town, for locals and tourists, adults and kids.

THINGS YOU HAVE TO DO IN CAPE TOWN BEFORE YOU DIE

1. Take a helicopter ride with the city’s TripAdvisor-rated number-one operator, Cape Town Helicopters, and see the Mother City like never before (ranked in the top three must-do tours in Cape Town). Using state-of-the-art, quieter and more eco-friendly (not to mention wider 270-degree window view) Airbus craft, you easily get the most Instagrammable views in Cape Town on the Cape Point flight or sweep that special someone off their feet and into the air on the VIP Winelands flight. Forget the ferry and see the historic Robben Island from a perspective-smashing new vantage point. And, get the full experience for a lot less than you think: the Hopper flight keeps you within budget with an extraordinary helicopter adventure for around the cost of two dinners at a city restaurant.

2. Go wine tasting, with a difference. There are over 2000 vineyards and wine estates in the Western Cape, so where to start? Book a wine tour with Wine Flies, the boutique touring company invites you to explore the province through wine. You can visit up to five wine estates a day – and even more if you choose to go on a weekend away.

3. Visit the world’s largest collection of contemporary African art. Marvel at the architecture, get lost in the art or just explore the Silo District at the V&A Waterfront around the Zeitz MOCAA Museum.

4. Soak up Cape Cape Malay culture and history through the sensational food by taking a Malay cooking course.

5. Be a beach bum. We have gorgeous stretches of sea and sand at every turn. Or opt for a thrill of a different kind and take a dip in one of our natural rock pools, dotted around the city and surrounds.


6. Take a Hop On Hop Off City Sightseeing Bus – this service is a tried, tested and very fun way of seeing the city’s main attractions. Or take an urban tour with Kiff Kombie.

7. Langebaan is a popular weekend destination for relaxing and unwinding. Rather than the usual holiday home accommodation, why not spend the weekend (or longer) living on a house boat in the West Coast National Park.

8. Join the Mother City’s favourite weekday past-time, First Thursdays when, on the first thursday of every month, city sights, particularly art galleries, restaurants and shops, stay open late into the night for all to enjoy the urban vibe after dark.

9. Sundays are about long lazy brunches and driving along our 9km stretch of paradise, namely Chapman’s Peak – it’s a must-do with breathtaking views.

10. Wile away the day at a tshisanyama, there’s a spot in any one of our townships. It’s where locals go to eat good meat, listen to music and chill with friends.

11. Collect a few of your friends to visit some of the very interesting caves we have around the city.

12. Soak up the urban creativity on a street art tour in Woodstock. This trendy neighbourhood boasts a number of walls adorned with art in an array of colours and designs.

13. Spend a day at one of the best nature reserves in South Africa, Cape Point.

14. There is a little walk that winds its way between Muizenberg and St. James, which is perfect for a gentle stroll with family and friends. Interestingly, this coastal stretch used to be known as Cape Town’s Golden Mile.

15. Give the Mystery Ghost Bus a go. This ride takes you to the Mother City’s oldest, spookiest venues, including the Kimberley Hotel and the Castle of Good Hope.

16. See the Garden Route on the Blue Train. This classic form of travelling is the epitome of elegance and luxury.

17. Try a Gatsby – Cape Town’s signature super loaf, which is usually stuffed with slap chips and a range of other fillings like polony, steak, atchar, and much more. It’s delicious.

18. This is a no brainer: You have to go up Table Mountain – it’s one of the New 7 Wonders of Nature.

19. Take an ever-awesome hike up Lion’s Head.

20. Spend a day exploring Simon’s Town (and be sure to travel there by train). It is home to the South African Navy’s largest naval base, and an authentic wartime submarine can be seen there.

21. Check out the Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens – The stunning garden was named “International Garden of the Year” by the International Garden Tourism Awards Body in 2015. There’s also a great treetop canopy walkway called the “Boomslang” that was declared the Most Beautiful Object in South Africa at the 2015 Design Indaba.

22. Make some exciting new discoveries at the V&A Waterfront – it’s more than a tourist spot, locals visit here every day. You’ll find that escape game specialists HintHunt have opened a new escape room experience inside the new kiddies indoor play area, Superpark. And you can grab artisanal street food, from real Durban curry to Vietnamese salmon and avo rice-paper rolls for R30 to 500g steamed West Coast mussels for R95 or even choose your own rump or fillet before it’s braaied for you at R30/100g, every day (or check out the free live music on weekends and public holidays) at the V&A Food Market.

23. Take advantage of the wonderful Signal Hill. You could paraglide off the famous mound with Parataxi, or soak in the views of the cool and calm Atlantic Ocean below, or just take a moment to watch the sunrise or sunset.

24. Check out the Old Biscuit Mill in Woodstock. This hotspot is home to the Neighbourgoods Market, the weekly Saturday market with artisanal food and drink, as well as a number of great clothing stands.

25. If you’re keen to check out “Cape Town’s most loved group activity”, challenge yourself and a group of your friends with Hint Hunt; the most exciting live escape game to hit the city.

26. Visit Boulder’s Beach in Simon’s Town. It is here where you will find a colony of penguins that settled there in 1982.

27. Take a trip to the historic Robben Island, home to the prison that housed many political prisoners under apartheid, the most famous being Nelson Mandela.

28. It is imperative that you check out Cape Town’s famous Long Street. The CBD roadway is known for its endless offering of clubs, pubs, bars, restaurants and more.

29. Head to the quaint seaside town of Kalk Bay for its beautiful views of the False Bay coastline, its charming little shops and the much more.  It is also a top spot for getting tasty fish and chips at the well-known fishery, Kalky’s.

30. Get inked. Tattoos are like potato chips; you can’t just have one. Consider the hand poke technique for your next piece. Palm Black Tattoo Co. is one of the only tattoo studios in the city that offer this interesting alternative to the conventional tattooing technique.

31. Make sure you visit Muizenberg beach. The popular sandy shoreline is a prime spot for surfing and features those well-known colourful changing booths that appear in many Cape Town tourist photos.

32. Check out Rhodes Memorial, which is located on the slopes of Devil’s Peak Mountain (at the University of Cape Town). This location offers great views of the city, and is also a chilled spot for selfies and relaxing with friends.

33. Go shark diving in Gansbaai. Just two hours away from Cape Town, this location is known as the Great White Shark capital of the world.

34. Take a personal pilgrimage through the the peninsula by walking the Cape Camino – the sacred walk of approximately 200km takes between seven and nine days on foot. It’s a wonderful opportunity for reflection as you explore beautiful Cape Town.

35. Check out the Bay Harbour Market in Hout Bay. This weekend shindig has over 80 trader stalls filled with delightful goods and also features live music and much more.

36. Marvel at the magic of our Milky Way at the Planetarium. This popular cultural institution hosts themed shows, the schedule of which is available on their website.

37. Watch the sunset from the back of an electric bicycle with GONOW. This is perfect if you want to culture-up your Instagram account, as the two-hour trip includes four to five photo opportunity stops at the Lionel Smit artwork in Sea Point.

38. Take a stroll through the Company’s Garden – you can picnic in the garden or read a book in the sun while the playful squirrels scurry around you. The delightful restaurant in the garden is worth visiting too when you get peckish.

39. Cycle through parts of the CBD with Moonlight Mass. The popular event takes place every full moon and invites both Capetonians and tourists to see Cape Town streets in a different, er, light.

40. Watch the Mother City wake up at a secret sunrise. We could say more, but it’s a secret.

41. Go seal snorkelling. It’s an ultimate Cape Town must-do. And you don’t need to be a pro. Plus your equipment is provided. All you do is follow the instructions (there are pro PADI master divers on hand) and chill in the water while Cape Fur Seals dance and dive in the water around you

42. View over 3000 creatures at the Two Oceans Aquarium. Perfect for kids and curious adults alike, this spot is home to thousands of aquatic species and even hosts children’s birthday parties.

43. Explore the Cape of Good Hope. This rocky headland is on the coast of the Cape Peninsula and is known as one of the great capes of the South Atlantic Ocean.

44. Enjoy morning or afternoon tea at the Mount Nelson Hotel. This activity has been a firm favourite among Capetonians and travellers alike for years and is really worth a try (if you’re not already a regular). Tea at the 12 Apostles Hotel is as delightful. Here the view alone will keep you entranced for hours.

45. Take a walk on the Sea Point Promenade. This stretch of path on the Atlantic Seaboard is a great spot for casual cycling, a workout (there’s an outdoor gym) and is ideal for taking your pet out for a walk.

46. Visit the V&A Waterfront. Tourists and Capetonians alike love it for its restaurants, local and international shops, and endless variety of entertainment. The Silo District has become one of the most popular spots at the V&A. Wander there too.

47. Go for a swim at Long Street Baths. This facility has been a favourite spot for Capetonians to cool off for more than over 100 years. It features a large indoor pool and Turkish steam baths.

48. Go glamping. The company to use for your luxury lodgings is AfriCamps. The outdoor living experts, who brought the concept of glamping to South Africa, have five camps, placed at some of the most beautiful farms and estates in the Cape: in Oudtshoorn, Swellendam, Robertson, Stanford and Plettenberg Bay.

49. Check out St George’s Cathedral (which was designed by Sir Herbert Baker). It is the oldest cathedral in Southern Africa and is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Cape Town.

50. Visit the Iziko Slave Lodge, one of the oldest buildings in Cape Town. This museum has been renamed multiple times over the years, and now explores the history of slaves in South Africa.

51. Discover the Lookout Hill in Khayelitsha. Situated just 30kms from Cape Town, this attraction is built on the largest sand dune on the Cape Flats and boasts stunning views of the surrounding area.

52. Revel at South African art at the Irma Stern Museum. The former home of the famous South African Expressionist painter Irma Stern (1894 – 1966), the space features a permanent exhibition of the artist’s paintings, drawings, ceramics and sculptures, as well as her private collection of early European furniture, African and Oriental art.

53. Take a step back in history at the District Six Museum. Located in the former inner-city residential area of District Six, where more than 60 000 residents were forcibly removed under the controversial Group Areas Act in 1966.

54. Sip and swirl top-class wine in Constantia, where some of South Africa’s oldest wine producing estates can be found, including the popular Groot Constantia. But there’s more, in the CBD you can enjoy Open Wine in a wine bar.

55. Check out the World of Birds. This is Africa’s largest bird park with over 3 000 birds and 400 different species spread over four hectares of land.

56. While visiting the Mother City dare to try “the world’s strongest coffee” by Black Insomnia Coffee Company

57. Learn to kitesurf at a world-accredited kite school in Cape Town because there are few things more exhilarating. You don’t have to be an expert, book a private or group lesson at High Five, they have awesome options.

58. Rev up your day with a ride on a Harley Davidson, you’ll get to hug the corners and lean into the curves as you roar around some of the City’s most spectacular coastal roads. Satisfy your need for speed as you ride pillion with an experienced driver from Cape Bike Travel.

59. You haven’t been to Cape Town if you haven’t cruised the bay. And Tigger 2 have been in the luxury cruise business for 22 years. From sunset cruises to dinner and lunch on the powered cat or a wedding on the water. Or have your office party, team building events, private functions and others too onboard the Tigger 2 Royale.

Source credit: www.capetownmagazine.com

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